Last month, Downtown Indy, Inc. launched a critical effort to spur Downtown’s sustainability and raise community support for Downtown. The Downtown Recovery Committee is made up of leaders representing businesses large and small, private and public, including minority and Black-owned businesses to address the economic challenges of COVID-19, as well as social and racial inequity. Having only met for the past three weeks, efforts are already taking shape to significantly fund short- and long-term strategies around safety/security, homelessness, cleanliness of Downtown, and then marketing. Learn more about the work they’re undertaking in the attached chart and read Sherry’s letter below. (Note – we will update plans here as details unfold.)

Sherry Seiwert: Downtown is not just a place. It is a relationship.

I really like cities. Especially downtowns. Which probably comes as no surprise given my leadership role with Downtown Indy Inc. As the urban place-management organization for downtown Indianapolis, our hyper-local focus is on working every day to make downtown the best place for business, residential growth and visitor attraction.

And now, in the throes of an economic and public health crisis, downtown is struggling. But it is also demonstrating the first vibrant signs of a rebound, which is critically important—not just for those of us who work or live downtown, but for the entire community.

Downtown delivers significant economic and community impact across both our city and region. Our downtown represents only 1.6% of the county’s total land mass, but it generates more than 11.3% of the property taxes for Marion County. When downtown is preforming well, we all benefit. Unfortunately, when downtown is hurting, we all will likely feel the pain.

It goes beyond economics. Most of us have some level of a relationship with downtown. It might be where we earn our living and where deals are made and networks are formed; where we go to celebrate victories and see champions crowned; where we seek out recreation through visiting parks, restaurants and attractions; where we entertain when hosting family and friends. No matter what, most residents of central Indiana have a relationship with downtown.

It is worthy of our investment, and the urgency to rebuild, recover, reimagine and reengage has never been greater as we focus on downtown’s economy, inclusion, vibrancy, identity and resilience. Now. Together. With vigor.

So, as we move from stabilization following these painful last few months to now recovery, our need and goal is to put forth a solution-focused approach to rebuilding downtown. We are assembling businesses, civic leaders and residents to outline essential drivers toward the reemergence of a thriving and inclusive downtown and a vibrant core.

The Downtown Indy Rebuilding and Recovery Committee, which we announced in June, will be co-chaired by civic leaders Lacy Johnson, a partner at Ice Miller LLC, and Thomas K. McGowan, president of Kite Realty Group Trust. Our first task: Clearly communicate that it is time to get back to business.

Longtime city and civic leader and champion Jim Morris, who currently serves as vice chairman of Pacers Sports & Entertainment, has often been quoted saying, “Indianapolis consistently punches above its weight class.” I could not agree more. And now, more than ever, we all need to be in the same corner. Government. Private sector. Not-for-profits. Residents. Old and young. Black, brown and white.

We certainly have some heavy lifting ahead of us, and we recognize the effects of current crises remain and may linger. But we must stand firm in further recognizing the resilience of our workforce, civic partners, elected officials and residents in addressing that which makes our downtown a thriving, diverse and vibrant city core.

So as we engage the community and get back to work, I encourage all to come downtown, dine in our restaurants, shop and reconnect with the place that connects us all—downtown.•

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Seiwert is president of Downtown Indy Inc. This letter was published in the Indianapolis Business Journal here.